Aeolus Recorder Konsort
Program at Parkway Village
Little Rock, Arkansas

Tuesday, June 5th, 2007

  1. Arkansas Traveler

    Based on a piano arrangement by William Cummings in 1847.  Arranged for recorders by Donald C. Wold.

  2. We're Coming Arkansas

    Vocal solo performed by Alice Rodgers.  Tune from Noble Cowden when she performed on April 25,1972, Mountain View, Arkansas.  She learned it about 1917 from her mother and father.  Arranged for recorders by Donald C.  Wold.

  3. Down in the Arkansas

    Tune from Jimmy Driftwood when he performed on April 19,1972, Mountain View, Arkansas.  Arranged for recorders by Donald C.  Wold.

  4. Folk tunes played as a medley by Sam Thoma and Louise Rollefson

    1. Merrily We Roll Along

    2. Go Tell Aunt Rhodie

    3. Oats, Peas, Beans, and Barley Grow

    4. Sweet Betsy From Pike
       

  5. I Feel Like My Time Ain't Long

    Vocal solo performed by Louise Rollefson.  Spiritual.  Music by William Grant Still* .  Arranged for recorders by Donald C. Wold. 

  6. Ring Play

    Music by William Grant Still*.  Arranged for recorders by Donald C. Wold. 

  7. Sinner, Please Don't Let This Harvest Pass

    Vocal solo performed by Louise Rollefson.  Spiritual.  Music by William Grant Still*.  Arranged for recorders by Donald C. Wold. 

  8. Your World

    Vocal solo performed by Louise Rollefson.  Music by William Grant Still*.  Arranged for recorders by Donald C. Wold. 

  9. Rémon

    Tune from Slave Songs of the United States, which was first published in 1867, and reprinted by Apple Books.  Arranged for recorders by Donald C. Wold.

  10. The Blue-Tailed Fly

    Traditional.  Arranged for recorders by James Carey.  Published by Fentone Music Ltd., 1994.

  11. Shenandoah

    Traditional.  Arranged for recorders by Donald C. Wold.

*William Grant Still (1895-1978) was one of the most important composers of the twentieth century.  It is the story of a boy who grew up in Arkansas and graduated as class valedictorian in 1911 from M. W. Gibbs High School in Little Rock, Arkansas.  Later he became recognized as the "Dean of Afro-American composers."  William Grant Still sought to inspire, and promote interracial understanding with his compositions.  For more information about his life and music, visit the website: www.williamgrantstillmusic.com .

The ensemble below included Connie Buller, André Rollefson, Louise Rollefson, Laurine Williams, Shelley Wold, Don Wold, and John Wood on recorder, with Alice Rodgers on dulcimer and Sam Thoma on recorder.